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sharongoodwin77

Jera's Jamboree

I’m an avid reader, loving nothing more than expanding my microcosmic world. I enjoy escaping into all sorts of worlds through reading and also love to challenge my opinions and thoughts.

The Privileges - Jonathan  Dee The lives of the Morey family are the focus in this novel on love and wealth.

The story opens with the marriage of Adam and Cynthia. Neither of them come from a ‘monied’ background, it is Cynthia’s stepfather Warren who provides the opulence from his bank balance……….. and neither of them had positive role models in their own parents. They are clearly in love. Their children, April and Jonas, are born quite early in the marriage and the stage is set.

Adam is a character who despite coming across as not looking back into the past has an obsession about his health, which is clearly related to the ill health suffered from his father. He begins to lead a charmed life thanks to his employer and when doing what he is told bores him he becomes involved in trading on the side – which also coincides with life not moving fast enough for Cynthia. I felt he was a character who didn’t think about how his actions affected others.

Cynthia also does not let the past affect her present. Apart from her love for Adam, this makes her appear shallow. If it wasn’t for how she reacted to a crisis with her children when they were younger, I wouldn’t have known that she actually loved them. In fact, I found the children’s earlier lives misleading as I thought Cynthia was going to be an over-protective mother but in their mid-teens she doesn’t even know whether they are in the penthouse or not!

The characters come across to the reader as very believable – even the ones on the periphery whose lives we know little about but can tell from their actions the type of people they are.

The Morey’s story is, I think, an accurate portrayal of two people who love each other to the exclusion of anyone else and how that effects all the other close relationships that should have been nurtured but instead are side-lined. It shows us that what some might consider to be a life lived successfully on the outside may be considered by others as scarred and broken on an inner level. JD has the dysfunctional family performing for us at an optimal level with the addition of the rich and ‘famous’ thrown in the mix. You may find yourself feeling uncomfortable at times – perhaps prompting you to look at your own ‘shadow’ side.

It is definitely worth reading if you like to read about the rich and successful. My only disappointment is that I was hoping there would be a different outcome to Adam’s underhand trading!